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Posts Tagged ‘off-season hockey training’

So today was a great day.

Because we sent out contracts for our first ever Okanagan Strength & Conditioning Conference. And we’ve lined up some big names to present at this event.

While I can’t name names just yet, as we need to have all the contracts signed first, it will be an epic event.

Hockey players, coaches and trainers would benefit greatly by attending this event. We are bringing in 5 different coaches and experts that train athletes at the highest levels of their sports.

One coach in particular has his name on the Stanley Cup.

I’ll let that sink in for a bit.

We’re talking about a strength and conditioning coach currently employed in the NHL in that capacity who has prepared players who won the Cup.

And he’s going to be speaking at our event. And he will be available to hang out with at our conference social. Plus we are trying to arrange for him to provide some extra coaching to our staff and hockey players that train here in the summer.

Now let me ask you something…how valuable would it be to you to be able meet, connect and learn from one of the most respected strength and conditioning coaches in the NHL?

What questions would you have for this coach?

What areas of your off-season training could be improved by spending some time with a coach of this calibre?

Obviously this type of opportunity would be invaluable. But here’s the kicker…these types of coaches aren’t readily available for these types of events. They work hard during the season and they have a number of commitments during the off-season. Any free time at all is spent with their families.

So we feel very fortunate to have someone like coming to our event to present, teach and help.

And I want to make sure you take advantage of this opportunity if it’s within your means. With that in mind I want to give you a special bonus for following this blog and demonstrating the commitment to improving your game. Here’s what I’d like to do.

Because many of you aren’t local to Kelowna I want to invite you to train at our facility for the week prior to our event. If you purchased a copy of PremierHockeyTraining.com you can access our facility for no additional cost.

Plus I will be there while you are training and be able to coach you through many of the lifts, exercises and drills you are working on.

Plus you will be able to train alongside many of the other hockey players we will be working with. This includes NHL players, European, NCAA, CIS, Junior as well as minor hockey league players.

If you need accomodations we have arranged a great rate with a hotel down the street from our facility.

Lastly, there may be a chance to do some of your training under the watchful eye of an NHL strength coach. I can’t promise you this yet but am working on making it happen.

If you are serious about improving your performance in hockey you owe it to yourself to be in Kelowna for the week leading up to August 17-18. It’s an amazing city and a great opportunity to train with many other highly motivated hockey players, in an incredible facility with top level coaching.

Leave me a comment below if you are interested or would like more details.

Chris                                                                                                                                                                                                                      onsidehockeytraining.com

 

 

Unless it’s an opponent I hate seeing people wasting their time and money.

There are enough things to think about and prepare for in hockey that we should be as focussed and efficient as possible.

Too often I see hockey players do too many drills and exercises not relevant to improving their performance. I put their in italics because the best hockey program for you is the one that addresses your needs and goals.

The best hockey program for you is not necessarily the one being followed by the highest scorer on your team.

Or by the strongest, most powerful player on your team.

Or the one used by the top players in the NHL. You’d be surprised how many times coaches, players and parents will tell me they got a copy of (substitute your favourite hockey player’s name)’s training program and could we follow that in our training?

Sure. We can do anything we want.

But would this program get you the best results? Would it prevent you from suffering from non-contact injuries? Would it be the best investment in your time and money?

Probably not.

Let me put it you this way.

Imagine you got sick. And the doctor said you needed a specific prescription. And this prescription would be dependent on your size, age, severity of symptoms and the time you had been sick.

Let’s add to this that this prescription was new to you and you wouldn’t know how you would respond. Heck, the doctor didn’t even know for sure if the prescription would work for you. Plus with every prescription there are always side effects. So even if the drug works for you you may still suffer from other symptoms by taking this drug.

Now let’s say your friend had a prescription filled for him or her a while back. And there was some left over. The prescription may or may not be for the same illness and symptoms you are experiencing. But we do know the following:

* you and your friend are different ages

* you are totally different sizes

* you don’t have the same experience (tolerance) to prescriptions

* the severity of your symptoms was quite different

Would you take your friend’s prescription?

Nobody would. In fact even if you had your own left over prescription from a previous illness you wouldn’t be allowed to bring this in to a hospital with you.

The prescription has to be specific to the individual.

That’s how your hockey training program should be. It should address your weaklinks and be specific to your goals.

Guess what?

This is exactly the first part of Premier Hockey Training (www.premierhockeytraining.com) the complete off-season training program for hockey.

In this program you receive an Assessment Package and Corrective Exercise Cheat Sheet.

This package walks you step by  step through the various tests to identify what your weaklinks are and what needs to be addressed first.

But knowing what your weaklinks are is useless you know how to fix them. This is exactly the purpose of the Corrective Exercise Cheat Sheet.

Does your knee collapse in when you stride? The Cheat Sheet shows you how to fix this.

Do you have one foot that turns out when you squat, lunge, step or run. The Cheat Sheet fixes this one too.

And here’s the kicker.

Not only are you at a greater chance of getting injured with these kinds of compensations but are wasting energy.

That’s right. Instead of directing power into the ice for movement you are directing it into your joints, which stresses the joints, and results in lower power production.

I hope this isn’t you. I hope you aren’t wasting energy. I hope you aren’t a liabilityto get injured.

The Assessment Package and Corrective Exercise Cheat Sheet in www.premierhockeytraining.com can address these issues before they become a problem.

Want a sneak peek? Here you go.

Corrective Exercise Treatment Table ‘Cheat Sheet’

Compensatory movement Tight/over active muscles  Weak/under active muscles  Treatment 
1. Foot turns out – externally rotates in anterior view
Calf complex:  gastrocnemius,
peroneals, soleus  

 

Gluteus medius, gluteus
maximus, medial hamstring
(posterior tibialis)  

 

SMR (foam roll) calf complex,
static stretch calf complex,
lateral band walking  

 

2. Knee moves inward – adducts                                                   
Adductor complex: (peroneals,
lateral gastrocnemius)

 

Gluteus medius and gluteus
maximus (posterior tibialis)

 

SMR adductor complex, calf
complex, lateral band walking, supine bridging
 

 

Sorry that the page cuts off the treatment part on the right. But in that column you are told the exact stretches and exercises to address your compensations. In total there are 11 common compensations laid out in specific detail for you.

Plus there are videos to go with the exercises.

And we can get on the phone and discuss your assessment if you like.

Want to get started on a hockey training program specific to you? Head over to www.premierhockeytraining.com now and pick up your copy today!

Chris                                                                                                                                                     onsidehockeytraining.com

 

 

 When I say ‘Model Success’ this isn’t what I mean.

We’re all familiar with the expression ‘to learn from our mistakes’.

And this sometimes encourages people to forge ahead before they have the best information. This can lead to wasted time and, obviously, mistakes.

A better option would be to model success.

With that in mind I have taken some time to sit with Sean Skahan who is the strength and conditioning coach for the Anaheim Ducks of the NHL. While under his coaching the Ducks have won a Stanley Cup and were represented by 8 players at the 2010 Olympic Games in Vancouver.

I think it’s safe to say his programs generate success on the ice. So to model some of Sean’s success I asked him a number of questions about this training methodologies.

Read on to find out Sean’s answers and model his success.

5. What are some things you wished players did a little less?

Sean didn’t have too much to say here. I guess this is a testament to the fact that he has earned the respect of this players and they don’t veer too far away fro whar he wants them to do.

Earlier in his career there was the occasional challenge of hockey players doing too much cardio for their off-season training. This might take a variety of forms but basically came down to long, aerobic conditioning.

Another challenge from earlier on was to have hockey players head home for the summer and do their own thing. They may enlist the help of coach or trainier in their area but this individual had different ideas about what these players were going to work on.

6. With the recent increase in head injuries in the NHL are the Ducks doing any specific related to this?

Sean does include some neck specific work for his players but admitted that head injuries are a part of the game. If a player suffers any type of head injury here is a very strict protocol that is followed involving various levels of the team’s medical staff. He did make one interesting comment about neck training and head injuries and that was to say no amount of neck training is going to off-set an opponent’s speed.

7. Another question I had for Sean involed the level of intensity used during lifting movements. There is some debate as to how heavy a player should lift. Some coaches like their hockey players to leave it all on the weight room floor. Others want to see them approach a max but be just under it.

Sean’s take on this was the load was secondary to the form of the lift. He wants the last rep to be excellent, just like the first rep.

In this regard I see what he is saying. It would be worse for a hockey player to use a submaximal load with terrible form than to attempt a 1 RM with excellent form.

8. Next I picked Sean’s brain about shoulder development. This is another area where you will find varying opinions from coaches as to whether or not they overhead press their hockey players.

While he didn’t express a hard rule for overhead pressing he did stress the importance they place on posterior shoulder work. They spend some time doing face pulls and going through their YLTW patterns.

Stay tuned for Part III in this series where I pick an NHL s&c coach’s brain for your benefit.

Chris                                                                                                                                       okanaganpeakperformance.com