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Posts Tagged ‘fat loss’

 

I’m always intrigued when an article comes out with a position that goes counter to what we normally believe when it comes to training, nutrition and recovery. 

I think it’s good when we hear things that challenge our conventional wisdom. It makes us think about why we do certain things. Do we simply select certain exercises because they are the ones we’ve always done? 

Or do we look for new ways of doing things that generate better results, or take less time or both. 

I’d like to think I’d fall into the second category. I know what my training philosophy is and I know what has worked for the hockey players I’ve worked with over the years. And when I come across something new I ask myself: 

* What is the purpose of this new ‘thing’, whether it be an exercise, a warm up, a recovery technique, a nutritional approach etc? 

* What about it is better than the old way of doing things? 

* Does it lend to better performance or reduced chance of injury? 

* Can we safely, effectively and morally implement this new ‘thing’ into our current programming and reap the benefits? 

Because when you think about we are exposed to new options every day. 

There are new pieces of training equipment. New types of shoes and apparel. New nutritional programs. As well many other options to do the job you are trying to with your hockey training. 

Recently the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) held meetings where a lot of buzz was created by the concept of training in a fasted state. 

This goes counter to what most coaches and trainers would advise their athletes to do. AIS nutritionist Louise Burke explains the interest is related to cell signalling. As the proteins of interest are locked up carbohydrate stores, depleting the body may free up these proteins to send the signal related to the demands of training. 

I’m not entirely sold on this idea just yet. And here’s why. 

A summary of the benefits of this type of training included reduction in levels of body fat and making the body less reliant on the use of carbohydrates as an energy source. 

I could brush my teeth with a screwdriver but I’d rather use a tooth brush. What I mean is that although we might be able to achieve an end goal (lower body fat) there are better ways to do this. 

Secondly, as the intensity of exercise goes up I want my body to well trained to use carbs as a fuel source. As I lower my intensity, the body uses less carbs and more fat as a fuel source. Hockey is an explosive, anaerobic sport where I want to be able to derive energy quickly from carbs. 

Thirdly, is it fat loss one of your main goals with your hockey training? Unless you’re Kyle Wellfed this probably doesn’t apply to you and many other hockey players. 

Further, one of the main reasons we encourage a pre-workout or game meal is to provide fuel for the efforts but as well to be glycogen sparing. As you deplete the muscle and liver of glycogen you impair the ability of the body to recover post-workout. 

And to hammer the point home further this is from the ACSM bulletin by Louise Burke. 

‘Follow-up studies using TL strategies in well-trained athletes have not found any performance benefits over TH, although the muscle chemistry adaptation in the TL condition has often shown superior gains. Importantly, TL strategies have interrupted the capacity of athletes to train at high speeds or high power outputs. 

Just to summarize Burke’s view on this topic: 

* there are no performance benefits 

* high speed and high power training is interrupted 

when applying a low carbohydrate approach as recommended per the AIS discussion. 

So what should you take out of all this? 

Basically, for now I would not recommend this approach for hockey players. Even if your goal involves losing bodyfat there are better ways to accomplish. 

Plus we should wait and see if other, independent labs can reproduce the same results and demonstrate benefits to training in a fasted state. 

Chris                                                                                                            onsidehockeytraining.com